Bullying at the University of Newcastle (Australia)

We are working to highlight and stop academic workplace bullying at the University of Newcastle, Australia. We are a group of staff and students who have been bullied for speaking out about misconduct.

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This will help us gather as much information as possible so that we can put an end to this bullying with its’ decades-long history.

“Systemic bullying, hazing and abuse generally are identified with poor, weak or toxic organizational cultures. Cultures that are toxic have stated ethical values that are espoused but not employed, and other non-ethical values which are operational, dominant, but unstated.

Such cultures thrive when good people are silent, silenced, or pushed out; when bad apples are vocal, retained, promoted, and empowered; and when the neutral majority remain silent in order to survive. Those who are most successful in such a toxic culture are those who have adapted to it, or adopted it as their own”. (McKay, Arnold, Fratzl & Thomas, 2008)

Monday, July 8, 2013

Bullies climbing higher and higher.....




A new study, published in the Journal of Managerial Psychology, has demonstrated that many workplace bullies achieve high levels of career success. 

"The study found that some workplace bullies have high social skill that they use to strategically abuse their coworkers, yet still receive positive evaluations from their supervisors."


“Many bullies can be seen as charming and friendly, but they are highly destructive and can manipulate others into providing them with the resources they need to get ahead,” says the study’s co-author, Darren Treadway, PhD. 

 The study also hypothesizes why bullies thrive, despite increased awareness and efforts to stop such abuse and harassment.
It also hypothesizes why bullies thrive, despite increased awareness and efforts to stop such abuse and harassment. - See more at: http://www.citytowninfo.com/career-and-education-news/articles/study-finds-bullies-finish-first-13070302#sthash.eFc4zFpm.dpuf
It also hypothesizes why bullies thrive, despite increased awareness and efforts to stop such abuse and harassment. - See more at: http://www.citytowninfo.com/career-and-education-news/articles/study-finds-bullies-finish-first-13070302#sthash.eFc4zFpm.dpuf

 The results showed a strong correlation between bullying, social competence and positive job evaluations. 
This finding comes as no surprise to many of us who have been victimised and bullied at the University of Newcastle.  The bullies have been rewarded. 

We have observed the people who bullied us, or colluded in the bullying, being promoted and/or receiving awards.  Lecturers have been promoted to senior lecturers, senior lecturers to associate professors, and the latter to professorships or higher.  Some staff have risen meteorically to the top of their schools or faculties.  Even those people who have been "counselled" for wrongdoing have been promoted.

Does this mean that the higher echelons of management at the University approve of the behaviour demonstrated by these bullies?


2 comments:

  1. One very clear index or value for sorting out bullying is if an institution takes great pride in the product they deliver. Meaning the people who create the industry ARE the industry rather than peripheral to it.

    I'm sorry to say that the University of Newcastle is not what it used to be. It is now pathetically greedy and servile. People used to matter, now they don't. If you get in the way of this corporation's money interests (like complaining about bullying etc.) they simply remove you from your colleagues and credibility.

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  2. The university is tremendously mediocre and awfully indecisive when it comes to basic moral conduct. They are now constantly trying reinforce their status as a world class university, yet the real evidence stands against this claim. The university of newcastle is definitely not above fabricating their own student satisfaction data as a way of keeping good business.

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