Bullying at the University of Newcastle (Australia)

We are working to highlight and stop academic workplace bullying at the University of Newcastle, Australia. We are a group of staff and students who have been bullied for speaking out about misconduct.

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This will help us gather as much information as possible so that we can put an end to this bullying with its’ decades-long history.

“Systemic bullying, hazing and abuse generally are identified with poor, weak or toxic organizational cultures. Cultures that are toxic have stated ethical values that are espoused but not employed, and other non-ethical values which are operational, dominant, but unstated.

Such cultures thrive when good people are silent, silenced, or pushed out; when bad apples are vocal, retained, promoted, and empowered; and when the neutral majority remain silent in order to survive. Those who are most successful in such a toxic culture are those who have adapted to it, or adopted it as their own”. (McKay, Arnold, Fratzl & Thomas, 2008)

Thursday, August 21, 2014

But will the investigation investigate the University of Newcastle?

The University of Newcastle has been given government funds to

"explore how industrial tribunals in the Hunter region are leading Australia in the proactive promotion of workplace co-operation."
 and 
"aim to uncover more information about how tribunals operate, as well as demonstrate the contribution workplace co-operation makes to enhanced organisational performance".

Industrial Tribunals are "independent judicial bodies that hear and determine claims to do with employment matters.  These include a range of claims relating to unfair dismissal, breach of contract, wages/other payments, as well as discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, disability, sexual orientation, age, part time working or equal pay."

How many cases of harassment, discrimination and unfair dismissal have been heard before the Newcastle Industrial Tribunal?

"The project's case studies will involve a range of Hunter organisations from both the public and private sectors, including Port Stephens Council, Delta Electricity's Lake Macquarie power station and large-scale construction projects."

Why is the University of Newcastle not one of the bodies being investigated?

Is this a case of "the pot calling the kettle black"?

5 comments:

  1. They are featureless and parasitic substrate of state and local government. They are a product of the Newcastle working class bully culture and abide by its rules. Their eager participation in the spoils of corruption confirms this uniform policy dictum.

    Their own poorly planned redevelopment proves that they are just as corrupt and behave the same way. I hope I'm wrong, my experience with the University tells me I'm not.

    Let's see how UoN squirms out of this one, if they can even be bothered to make a statement.

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  2. You can pay someone corrupt all the money you want. You can talk tribunals and industry specifics all day long if you like. It will not change anything. Look at anti-bullying websites and be sceptical of the "clean slate" approach from organisations. It sanitises and sanctions atrocity.

    We are talking about people who can lie endlessly and have no concern for others at all. They will hire a fellow bully to run the "investigation".

    The damage to 100's of people has already been done. Permanent and lasting scars.

    It would be incredibly foolish to suddenly start trusting the same people who have created the problem.

    I accept the fact that I will denied any rights in Newcastle.

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  3. This is Newcastle University's obvious smokescreen to deflect its victims from the truth. That they are corrupt.

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  4. Basically the University is being bribed by the government to look innocent because education in the area brings in big dollars.

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  5. http://theconversation.com/five-trends-that-jeopardise-public-education-around-the-world-28969

    From John Fieschetti, Dean of Education at University of Newcastle.

    Part of the smokescreen?

    ReplyDelete