Bullying at the University of Newcastle (Australia)

We are working to highlight and stop academic workplace bullying at the University of Newcastle, Australia. We are a group of staff and students who have been bullied for speaking out about misconduct.

Help make a difference –

*answer our survey,

*contribute to the blog, or

*contact us.

This will help us gather as much information as possible so that we can put an end to this bullying with its’ decades-long history.

“Systemic bullying, hazing and abuse generally are identified with poor, weak or toxic organizational cultures. Cultures that are toxic have stated ethical values that are espoused but not employed, and other non-ethical values which are operational, dominant, but unstated.

Such cultures thrive when good people are silent, silenced, or pushed out; when bad apples are vocal, retained, promoted, and empowered; and when the neutral majority remain silent in order to survive. Those who are most successful in such a toxic culture are those who have adapted to it, or adopted it as their own”. (McKay, Arnold, Fratzl & Thomas, 2008)

Friday, March 13, 2015

Monitoring this website

Image result for wasting tax money 



How much does the University of Newcastle pay Google to monitor this website?

Does the public know that it is their money that is being spent on this EXTREMELY DANGEROUS website?

3 comments:

  1. I hope they are monitoring it.

    Because it means

    a) Freedom of speech is not dead.

    No free thought allowed at the University but it is accepted here. Google has restored our basic right to protest. Even a professor who taught there for 14 years (Biggs) has been censored by the University.

    b) This blog raises the scenarios and issues that the University have repeatedly failed to address. They have no excuse since the cases are out in the open.

    c) The truth messes with their business interests of attracting more funding and victims to be controlled. The more money they spend monitoring this just proves just how important this is to them.

    d) This blog is about people, their stories and their pain. It is a lifeline for silenced victims.
    It is about people networking using information technology. It is a meeting point for academics who were attacked for defending basic human rights and academic principles. We describe the pain we have experienced.

    The fact is, bullying is psychological assault and plagiarism is theft. The University would rather creep behind the scenes and attack the victims instead. That is why this blog has to exist.

    If a University representive would like to contribute here then please, show everyone how it can be different.

    This is a chance for the University to show how it can make a positive change.

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    Replies
    1. Google does not allow free speech - it monitors this site for anything against its conditions of use. I assume that the uni pays Google to check the site, the same as the uni got it to block the Youtube video from Australian viewers for some time.

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    2. I am hoping in the interests of maintaining an honest and open process that Google allow the blog to continue. It is a lifeline.

      So far all of the comments have abided by the terms of service. There are no racist, sexist or homophobic comments as well as no overt threats of violence or counterscheme. There is no extremity of religious ideology or incitement of any kind.

      Actually the University specialises in what qualifies as such right down to the letter. I am no specialist.

      I am also assuming that the University petitioned Google financially or otherwise to suppress the protest YouTube video. The video which was later made available.

      How I would handle the video / blog if I were in management...

      If the video was inaccurate I would make sure University set the record straight. I would address the issues in print and in person and encourage outside input.

      If this blog was of concern then I would openly meet with the victims and seek their advice wholeheartedly so that it doesn't happen again.

      In management I would never hide behind a wall of silence thinking that would be good enough. That gesture would insult the intelligence of everyone.

      To this date the University have consistently refused to acknowledge any outside protests or meet with any of the victims. Something to hide?





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